The nationwide event will see marches begin in North East England on March 16 and culminate with a mass rally in London on March 29 – the day Theresa May had pledged Britain would quit the EU. Organised by pro-Brexit pressure group Leave Means Leave, the protest aims to “show the level of popular dissatisfaction” with how the divorce from Brussels is being handled. Brexiteer Nigel Farage, who serves as an MEP for South East England, said: “The Westminster elite are in the process of betraying the British people over Brexit.

“All of us who want Britain to be a great country once again accept that we must be prepared to stand up for what we believe in and fight for our independence.”

The Prime Minister this week admitted Britain’s scheduled exit date of March 29 could be pushed back if her deal fails to secure enough support.

She told the Commons that if MPs reject her terms, then also reject leaving without a deal, they will have the chance to vote on requesting an extension to Article 50, the mechanism by which the UK will leave the EU.

The Leave Means Leave marches will begin on March 16 in Sunderland – the first city to return a Leave vote in the 2016 referendum.

Organisers say they aim to have a “core group of marchers” on each leg of the route. There is a £50 charge for those taking part.

Marches are scheduled to take place in Hartlepool, Pontefract, Doncaster and Wellingborough.

The protests will end with a rally in Westminster on March 29.

Supporters of a second referendum are staging a mass protest in London the weekend before as they demand the Government give the public another say over Brexit.

Leave Means Leave founder and vice-Chairman Richard Tice said: “Over 17 million people voted Leave in the EU referendum, many for the first time, in the greatest democratic exercise in the history of our nation.

“Failing to deliver a true Brexit will permanently damage the British people’s faith in democracy.

“The mood of the country is increasingly ‘Let’s go WTO – let’s save £39bn’.”

Brexiteers argue that leaving the EU with no deal and dropping back on to World Trade Organisation (WTO) terms would allow Britain to trade freely with the rest of the world and cut tariffs to reduce prices for consumers.

But official projections say abruptly cutting ties with Brussels would have a major impact on the economy.

Government forecasts estimate the UK economy would be between 6 and 9 percent smaller after 15 years than it otherwise would have been.

And an official report on the impact of a no-deal Brexit published this week warned customs checks required if trading on WTO terms could cost businesses up to £13bn a year.

The document, which was drawn up for Theresa May’s Cabinet, also said “some food prices are likely to increase” in the wake of a no deal.

28th February, 2018; The Daily Express